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SLS - space launch system (3-я попытка)
 
https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/multimedia/last-test-article-for-sls-departs-maf.html
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June 27, 2019

Last Test Article for NASA’s SLS Rocket Departs Michoud Assembly Facility



The last of four structural test articles for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) was loaded onto NASA’s Pegasus barge Wednesday, June 26, 2019, at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. The barge will deliver the liquid oxygen (LOX) tank structural test article from Michoud to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for critical structural testing. The liquid oxygen tank is one of two propellant tanks in the rocket’s core stage that will produce more than 2 million pounds of thrust to help send Artemis 1, the first flight of NASA’s Orion spacecraft and SLS, to the Moon. The nearly 70-foot-long test article is structurally identical to the flight version, which will hold 196,000 gallons of liquid oxygen super cooled to minus 297 degrees Fahrenheit.

NASA is working to land the first woman and next man on the Moon by 2024. SLS is part of NASA’s backbone for deep space exploration, along with Orion and the Gateway in orbit around the Moon. SLS is the only rocket that can send Orion, astronauts and supplies to the Moon on a single mission.

Image Credit: NASA/Jude Guidry

Last Updated: June 27, 2019
Editor: Jennifer Harbaugh
 
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Spaceflight Now‏ @SpaceflightNow 3 ч. назад

NASA's Mobile Launcher for the SLS rocket is making its way up the ramp to launch pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center this morning to begin a series of tests and checkouts.




2 ч. назад

The SLS Mobile Launcher has climbed to the top of the launch pad 39B ramp against a stormy backdrop at the Kennedy Space Center.




55 мин. назад

The final roll of the SLS Mobile Launcher on to the launch pad is on hold until lightning warnings are lifted at Kennedy Space Center.

 
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NASA's Exploration Ground Systems‏Подлинная учетная запись @NASAGroundSys 9 мин. назад

Look who's arrived in place at Launch Complex 39B! The team is now testing the mount load sensors on the pad with the mobile launcher.

 
https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/multimedia/artemis-1-engines-delivered-to-nasa-s-michoud-assembly-facility.html
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June 28, 2019

Artemis 1 Engines Delivered to NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility



Crews delivered the last of four RS-25 engines for Artemis 1, the first flight of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the Orion spacecraft, from NASA’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, to NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Thursday, June 27, 2019. The engines, located at the bottom of the rocket’s massive core stage, are fueled by liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. When Artemis 1 launches to the Moon, the four RS-25 engines will fire nonstop for 8.5 minutes, providing the rocket 2 million of its 8.8 million pounds of maximum thrust at liftoff. Technicians from NASA and Aerojet Rocketdyne, the lead contractor for the engines, at Michoud will now prepare the four engines for installation to the rest of the core stage later this summer.

NASA is working to land the first woman and next man on the Moon by 2024. SLS is part of NASA’s backbone for deep space exploration, along with Orion and the Gateway in orbit around the Moon. SLS is the only rocket that can send Orion, astronauts and supplies to the Moon on a single mission.

Image Credit: Aerojet Rocketdyne

Last Updated: June 28, 2019
Editor: William Bryan
 
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/06/28/sls-mobile-launcher-moves-to-pad-39b-for-final-exams/
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SLS mobile launcher moves to pad 39B for final exams
June 28, 2019 | Stephen Clark


The Space Launch System’s Mobile Launcher rolls down the crawlerway Thursday at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida toward pad 39B. Credit: Stephen Clark/Spaceflight Now

A towering mobile platform for the agency’s Space Launch System arrived at launch pad 39B Friday at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for a sequence of water and propellant flow tests, swing arm checkouts and other rehearsals that should conclude with managers declaring the spaceport’s ground systems ready to support the first SLS launch campaign by the end of the year.

The Mobile Launcher is a moving platform that will transfer the 322-foot-tall (98-meter) Space Launch System fr om the Vehicle Assembly Building to the launch pad. The $1 billion tower is one of the tallest structures in the Cape Canaveral area, and NASA originally built it for the Ares 1 rocket, a single-booster launcher that was cancelled in 2010 before it ever flew on an orbital mission.

The rollout of the Mobile Launcher to pad 39B this week caps nine months of electrical and mechanical testing inside the Vehicle Assembly Building. After checking the platform and tower’s compatibility with the VAB, where the Space Launch System will be stacked, engineers now want to ensure it will work at the launch pad.

“It’s that next big step right before the final exam, before we’re done,” said Cliff Lanham, NASA’s senior project manager for the Mobile Launcher. “So we’re all very excited. I know our operations group is ready to get ahold of it, so they can operating it with the rocket. Everybody’s pumped about this.”

But exactly when NASA can finally put the Mobile Launcher to use is hard to predict, officials said Thursday. Difficulties with the assembly of the Space Launch System’s Boeing-built core stage in Louisiana have put in doubt a first launch of the new rocket in 2020, three years later than originally envisioned.

NASA is developing the Space Launch System to send astronauts on voyages to the moon — with a goal of a human landing there within five years — by way of a mini-space station the space agency plans to assemble in a high lunar orbit.

The space agency says the first SLS launch, without a crew on-board, could still happen before the end of 2020, but any technical problems discovered in several critical upcoming ground tests could delay the launch as late as June 2021, according to a Government Accountability Office report released earlier this month.

NASA officials said the rollout of the Mobile Launcher to pad 39B should be the last time the mammoth structure makes the trip to the launch pad before ground crews stack the Space Launch System on the platform in preparation for the first flight.
Скрытый текст
 
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Chris B - NSF‏ @NASASpaceflight 8 мин. назад

FEATURE ARTICLE:
Shuttle veteran RS-25 engines ready for SLS Core Stage installation ahead of Artemis-1 -

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019/07/shuttle-rs-25-ready-sls-core-installation-artemis-1/

A 5,000 word feature over two pages on this major milestone for SLS by Philip Sloss.




 
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Chris B - NSF‏ @NASASpaceflight 2 ч. назад

FEATURE ARTICLE:
Waiting for Artemis 1 schedule update, official decision on SLS Green Run -

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019/07/waiting-artemis-1-schedule-decision-sls-green-run/

By Philip Sloss.

Lead Render by Mack Crawford (@brickmack) for NSF/L2

 
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3, 2, 1... Lift-Off of the Artemis 1 Mission to the Moon

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

Премьера состоялась 118 минут назад

Hear the countdown and see how NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS), the world’s most powerful rocket, will send the Orion spacecraft to the Moon on the Artemis 1 Mission. This video takes you through the pre-launch sequence at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida and through all the flight operations as SLS launches Orion and sends it on to lunar orbit.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7VvozsSG23w (2:52)
 
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NASA Conducts Successful Water Flow Test with Mobile Launcher

NASAKennedy

Опубликовано: 9 июл. 2019 г.

A successful water flow test with the mobile launcher at Kennedy Space Center’s Pad 39B on July 2, 2019, put NASA one step closer to returning astronauts to the Moon by 2024, with the goal of sending humans to Mars. It was the first of nine tests to verify the sound suppression system is ready for launch of NASA’s Space Launch System for the first Artemis mission.

Approximately 450,000 gallons of water was released from an elevated water tank and distributed through large diameter piping and valves to water nozzles located in the Pad B flame deflector, the mobile launcher flame hole and on the launcher’s blast deck in just 45 seconds. That’s enough water to fill 45 residential swimming pools! The system reached a peak flow rate of 1.1 million gallons per minute.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFve9BrKj7k (1:03)
 
https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/nasa-sls-rocket-testing-ensures-astronaut-safety-mission-success.html
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July 9, 2019

NASA SLS Rocket Testing Ensures Astronaut Safety, Mission Success

As the world reflects on the 50th anniversary of the Apollo missions, NASA is looking forward to its next giant leaps. One way NASA ensures the safety of astronauts and the success of the Artemis missions to the Moon in preparation for future missions to Mars is by testing the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket structures.

With the recent delivery of the last structural test article, the liquid oxygen tank, to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and the start of testing in June for the largest structural test article — the 149-foot-tall liquid hydrogen tank — NASA is more than halfway through SLS structural testing.


The fourth and final structural test article for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) core stage was unloaded fr om NASA’s barge Pegasus at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, Tuesday, July 9, 2019. The nearly 70-foot-long liquid oxygen (LOX) tank structural test article was manufactured at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans and is structurally identical to the flight version. Next, crews will load it into a test stand at Marshall for critical testing. The liquid oxygen tank is one of two propellant tanks in the rocket’s core stage that will produce more than 2 million pounds of thrust to help launch Artemis 1, the first flight of NASA’s Orion spacecraft and SLS, to the Moon.
Credits: NASA/Fred Deaton


“This is a historic moment for the Marshall team as well as a significant milestone for the Artemis program,” said SLS program manager John Honeycutt. “We are more than halfway through the largest test campaign at Marshall since articles from NASA’s Space Shuttle Program were tested here. With the delivery of the liquid hydrogen tank test article, we’re entering the final stage of Space Launch System structural testing.”
Скрытый текст

Last Updated: July 10, 2019
Editor: Lee Mohon
 
Установили static test article кислородного бака на стенд.
Последний неиспытанный элемент. https://twitter.com/BoeingSpace/status/1150767028673949696
 
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Watch as Crews Load Final SLS Test Article into Marshall Test Stand

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

Опубликовано: 18 июл. 2019 г.

This video shows how crews lifted the liquid oxygen (LOX) tank structural test article for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket into Test Stand 4697 on July 10, 2019, at NASA’s Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Engineers fr om Marshall’s Center Operations team moved the test article from NASA’s Pegasus barge on July 9. The barge delivered the test article from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, wh ere it was manufactured. The test article is structurally identical to the flight version of the propellant tank, which will hold 196,000 gallons cryogenic liquid oxygen. Hydraulic cylinders within the test stand will push and pull the tank, subjecting it to the same stresses and loads it will face during liftoff and flight, to certify it fit for flight. The tank is one of two propellant tanks in the SLS core stage that will help power the rocket and NASA’s Orion spacecraft to the Moon on the Artemis missions. Video Credit: NASA/Tyler Martin
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Co6QCMP1Ykg (0:20)
 
https://ria.ru/20190721/1556730329.html
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США завершили работу над космическим кораблем "Орион"
00:22

ВАШИНГТОН, 21 июл - РИА Новости. США завершили работу транспортным космическим кораблем многоразового использования "Орион" и намерены направить его к полету вокруг Луны, говорится в сообщении НАСА.
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"Вице-президент США Майк Пенс... объявил о том, что капсула для экипажа "Орион" готова к первой лунной миссии "Артемида", - говорится в сообщении.
"Артемида-1" запустит космический корабль НАСА "Орион" и ракету Space Launch System вокруг Луны, чтобы испытать систему и подготовить высадку первой женщины и следующего мужчины на Луне через пять лет, а также будущие миссии к Марсу", - заявили в НАСА.

"Создание корабля "Орион" для экипажа миссии "Артемида-1" завершено, и он готов начать подготовку к историческому первому полету", - сказал Пенс.

НАСА уточняет, что сборка первого "Ориона" была недавно завершена. Также готов и европейский сервисный модуль - основной компонент мощности системы, который разработало Европейское космическое агентство, его доставили в США в ноябре 2018 года для окончательной сборки.

Теплозащита оболочки корабля будет завершена в ближайшее время, а в сентябре его перевезут в Огайо, где проведут окончательные испытания. Когда корабль будет готов к полету, НАСА не сообщает.

США в эти дни отмечают 50-летие первой высадки американских астронавтов на Луну.
 
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tnt22 написал:
Теплозащита оболочки корабля будет завершена в ближайшее время, а в сентябре его перевезут в Огайо, где проведут окончательные испытания. Когда корабль будет готов к полету, НАСА не сообщает.
Значит не завершено.
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"Создание корабля "Орион" для экипажа миссии "Артемида-1" завершено, и он готов начать подготовку к историческому первому полету", - сказал Пенс.
Как и нету экипажа в этом полете
 
В январе 2020 должен будет доставлен на космодром для окончательной подготовки к пуску. Пока по графику так.
 
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pnetmon написал:
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"Создание корабля "Орион" для экипажа миссии "Артемида-1" завершено, и он готов начать подготовку к историческому первому полету", - сказал Пенс.
Как и нету экипажа в этом полете
А надо? За что вы так не любите астронавтов? ;)
 
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NASA_SLS‏ Подлинная учетная запись @NASA_SLS 8 мин. назад

We're renaming today What a View Wednesday! These drone images were captured as teams at @NASA_Marshall transported the liquid oxygen tank test article, the final test article for the rocket, from NASA's Pegasus barge to the test stand. LEARN MORE >> http://go.nasa.gov/2ZXbvf9



 
От она какая в сборе.
В августе должны начать прикручивать двигатели.

 
Решили окончательно = прожиг на полную длительность будет
https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/green-run-test-paves-way-for-nasa-moon-missions.html
 
https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/green-run-test-paves-way-for-nasa-moon-missions.html
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July 25, 2019

“Green Run” Test Will Pave the Way for Successful NASA Moon Missions

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine announced July 25 the agency will conduct an “Green Run” engine test for the Space Launch System rocket ahead of the upcoming Artemis 1 lunar mission.

This is how the Green Run will work:

The first eight minutes of every Artemis mission with NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket will begin with core stage and solid rocket boosters producing 8.8 million pounds of thrust to launch the agency’s Orion spacecraft to the Moon. NASA will test the rocket’s 212-foot tall core stage- the tallest rocket stage the agency has ever built- with a “Green Run” test on Earth before launch day to help ensure mission success and pave the way for future Artemis missions carrying crew to the Moon. Missions at the Moon will be a stepping stone to prepare for human exploration of Mars.

During the Green Run testing, engineers will install the core stage that will send Orion to the Moon in the B-2 Test Stand at NASA’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi for a series of tests that will build like a crescendo over several months. The term “green” refers to the new hardware that will work together to power the stage, and “run” refers to operating all the components together simultaneously for the first time. Many aspects will be carried out for the first time, such as fueling and pressurizing the stage, and the test series culminates with firing up all four RS-25 engines to demonstrate that the engines, tanks, fuel lines, valves, pressurization system, and software can all perform together just as they will on launch day.

“The SLS core stage is an engineering feat that includes not only the largest rocket propellant tanks ever built but also sophisticated avionics and main propulsion systems,” said Lisa Bates, SLS deputy stages manager. “While the rocket is designed to evolve over time for different mission objectives, the core stage design will remain basically the same. The Green Run acceptance test gives NASA the confidence needed to know the new core stage will perform again and again as it is intended.”

The SLS core stage includes state-of-the-art avionics, miles of cables and propulsion systems and two huge liquid propellant tanks that collectively hold 733,000 gallons of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen to power the four RS-25 engines. Together, they will produce more than 2 million pounds of thrust to help send Artemis 1 beyond Earth’s orbit to the Moon.

The test program for the core stage at Stennis will begin with installing the stage into the test stand. Then, engineers will turn the components on one by one through a series of initial tests and functional checks designed to identify any issues. Those tests and checks will culminate in an eight-minute-long test fire, mimicking the full duration of the stage’s first flight with ignition, ascent and engine shutdown. The results of this test also will provide important data that will confirm how the system reacts as the fuel is depleted from the propellant tanks.

“With Green Run, we verify each individual component operates well within the core stage system,” said Bates. “It’s more than testing. It’s the first time the stage will come to life and be fully operational from the avionics in the top of the core stage to the engines at the bottom.”

The test series is a collaborative effort between a number of NASA field centers, programs and contractors. The entire stage was built and manufactured at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. The structural test articles, also built at Michoud, were shipped to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for structural testing. The work done by Marshall’s test teams certifies the structural integrity of the rocket’s core stage, while Green Run shows that the integrated stage operates correctly. The Stennis teams renovated the historic B-2 Test Stand used to test stages for multiple programs including the Saturn V and the space shuttle propulsion system in the 1970s.

“Green Run is a historic moment for NASA and Stennis for a number of reasons,” said Dr. Richard Gilbrech, Director, Stennis Space Center. “For the first time in NASA’s history, a launch vehicle will use flight hardware for its first test, and the Stennis test stands will once again test the core stage for Moon missions.”

Historically, other NASA rockets built to carry astronauts have used main propulsion test articles to test the integrated engines and main propulsion system. The SLS program is performing the stage testing with flight hardware. Once the validation of the stage is complete, the entire stage will be checked out, refurbished as needed, and then shipped to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for the Artemis 1 launch. The next time the core stage engines roar to life will be on the launchpad at Kennedy.

NASA is working to land the first woman and next man on the Moon by 2024. SLS and Orion, along with theGateway in orbit around the Moon, are NASA’s backbone for deep space exploration. SLS is the only rocket that can send Orion, astronauts and supplies to the Moon on a single mission.

Last Updated: July 25, 2019
Editor: Jennifer Harbaugh
Изменено: tnt22 - 25.07.2019 23:05:39
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