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SpaceX Falcon 9
 
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Not пишет:
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pnetmon пишет:
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Industry officials have known about problems with cracked blades on Falcon 9 versions for many months or even years. But cracks continued to be found during tests as recently as September 2016, Robert Lightfoot, NASA’s acting administrator, confirmed in an interview with The Wall Street Journal earlier this week.
Короче как только власть в NASA сменилась, так сразу "неожиданно" (или как любит толкнуть ВалериЖ - внезапно!) вскрылись серьезные проблемы.  ;)
Ну, про трещины в ТНА упоминалось в той насовской бумаге, где описывалось состояние/прогресс обоих пилотируемых проектов. Так что при чем здесь неожиданность?  
 
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Виктор Кондрашов пишет:
Так что при чем здесь неожиданность?
Это Not. Он у нас слегка спятил на Маске и все время ищет поводы его в чем-нибудь обвинить...
И мы пошли за так, на четвертак, за ради бога
В обход и напролом и просто пылью по лучу...
 
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Виктор Кондрашов пишет: Ну, про трещины в ТНА упоминалось в той насовской бумаге, где описывалось состояние/прогресс обоих пилотируемых проектов. Так что при чем здесь неожиданность?
В какой "той"? Процитируйте.
 
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Alex_II пишет:
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Виктор Кондрашов пишет:
Так что при чем здесь неожиданность?
Это Not. Он у нас слегка спятил на Маске и все время ищет поводы его в чем-нибудь обвинить...
Это Алекс. Он все время просто хамит.
 
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Not пишет:
Это Алекс. Он все время просто хамит.
Кому?
И мы пошли за так, на четвертак, за ради бога
В обход и напролом и просто пылью по лучу...
 
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Not пишет:
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Виктор Кондрашов пишет: Ну, про трещины в ТНА упоминалось в той насовской бумаге, где описывалось состояние/прогресс обоих пилотируемых проектов. Так что при чем здесь неожиданность?
В какой "той"? Процитируйте.
Упс, ошибся я. Не в ТНА там были трещины, а в "коридоре".  :)  
For example, in January 2015, the tunnel that provides a passageway for astronauts and cargo between
the Dragon and the ISS was reported to have cracked during the heat treatment phase of the
manufacturing process.
https://oig.nasa.gov/audits/reports/FY16/IG-16-028.pdf

Кстати, у Боинга есть проблема вибраций, да и с парашютами не все ладно.  :)
https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/02/report-congressional-analysts-worry-spacex-engines-are-prone-to-cracks/
 
Про трещины в ТНА было известно еще в сентябре


http://novosti-kosmonavtiki.ru/forum/messages/forum13/topic11844/message1555306/#message1555306
 
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Apollo13 пишет:
Про трещины в ТНА было известно еще в сентябре


http://novosti-kosmonavtiki.ru/forum/messages/forum13/topic11844/message1555306/#message1555306
Упс again, оказывается я не ошибся. Просто в этот раз проглядел.  :D
 
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Apollo13 пишет:
Про трещины в ТНА было известно еще в сентябре

http://novosti-kosmonavtiki.ru/forum/messages/forum13/topic11844/message1555306/#message1555306
Можно сказать еще до сентября - даты публикации 1 сентября.
Спасибо.

А журналисты пишут лажу про сентябрь (как бы сентябрь - это после взрыва)
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https://www.wsj.com/articles/congressional-investigators-warn-of-spacex-rocket-defects-1486067874
Industry officials have known about problems with cracked blades on Falcon 9 versions for many months or even years. But cracks continued to be found during tests as recently as September 2016, Robert Lightfoot, NASA’s acting administrator, confirmed in an interview with The Wall Street Journal earlier this week.
Изменено: pnetmon - 05.02.2017 15:14:05
 
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-space-spacex-idUSKBN15M03N?feedType=RSS&feedName=topNews&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=­Social
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Mon Feb 6, 2017 | 8:26pm EST
Exclusive: SpaceX to hit fastest launch pace with new Florida site - executive
By Irene Klotz | CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

Space Exploration Technologies Corp, better known as SpaceX, plans to launch its Falcon 9 rockets every two to three weeks, its fastest rate since starting launches in 2010, once a new launch pad is put into service in Florida next week, the company's president told Reuters on Monday.
The ambitious plan comes only five months after a SpaceX rocket burst into flames on the launch pad at the company's original launch site in Florida. SpaceX, controlled by billionaire Elon Musk, has only launched one rocket since then, in mid-January.
“We should be launching every two to three weeks,” SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell told Reuters in an interview on Monday.
SpaceX was approaching that pace last autumn, before the Sept. 1 accident, which happened during a routine preflight test. The explosion destroyed a $200 million Israeli satellite and heavily damaged the launch pad.
Shotwell said repairs to the launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, which are still underway, should cost “far less than half” of a new launch pad, which she said runs about $100 million. The new launch pad is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, just north of the Cape Canaveral site.
SpaceX is also modifying the rocket's engines to increase performance and resolve potential safety concerns, said Shotwell.
The company plans to change the design of the Falcon 9's turbopump - which provides propellants to the rocket's engines - to eliminate cracks that have prompted concern from NASA and the U.S. Air Force.
NASA has hired SpaceX to taxi astronauts to and from the International Space Station starting in late 2018.
Shotwell said the new turbopumps will be installed before the first unmanned test flights of the commercial space taxi, scheduled for November.
SpaceX is one of two companies certified to fly military and national security satellites for the Air Force, the other being United Launch Alliance, a partnership of Boeing Co (BA.N) and Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N).
“For us, the concern was not the cracks, but do they grow over time? Would these cracks cause a flight failure?” Shotwell said. “I think NASA is used to engines that aren’t quite as robust, so they just don’t want any cracks at all in the turbo machinery."
SpaceX discovered two types of cracks during ground tests of its Merlin engines in 2015, Shotwell said. The cracks were not related to the Sept. 1 launch pad explosion.
To fix the more serious cracking issue, the company devised a software fix and then redesigned the turbine wheel, Shotwell said. The first of the redesigned turbine wheels flew in July 2016.
A second set of cracks in welds and shrouds are not a concern for flight, but NASA and the Air Force have asked for a redesign, Shotwell said.
SpaceX has a backlog of more than 70 missions, worth more than $10 billion. It has successfully flown 27 out of 29 times since the Falcon 9’s debut in 2010.
The company flew eight missions in 2016 before the launch pad accident in September grounded the fleet. The rocket returned to flight last month, flying from a second launch site in California, which is only used for satellites heading into polar or high inclination orbits.
A fourth launch site in Texas is under construction.
Изменено: Salo - 07.02.2017 09:05:13
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"
 
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To fix the more serious cracking issue, the company devised a software fix and then redesigned the turbine wheel, Shotwell said. The first of the redesigned turbine wheels flew in July 2016.
A second set of cracks in welds and shrouds are not a concern for flight, but NASA and the Air Force have asked for a redesign, Shotwell said.
То есть Not как всегда соврал:
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Not пишет:
Короче как только власть в NASA сменилась, так сразу "неожиданно" (или как любит толкнуть ВалериЖ - внезапно!) вскрылись серьезные проблемы. [IMG]
Ну, предсказуемо, чё...
И мы пошли за так, на четвертак, за ради бога
В обход и напролом и просто пылью по лучу...
 
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Salo пишет:
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-space-spacex-idUSKBN15M03N?feedType=RSS&feedName=topNews&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=­Social
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Mon Feb 6, 2017 | 8:26pm EST
Exclusive: SpaceX to hit fastest launch pace with new Florida site - executive
By Irene Klotz | CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

Space Exploration Technologies Corp, better known as SpaceX, plans to launch its Falcon 9 rockets every two to three weeks, its fastest rate since starting launches in 2010, once a new launch pad is put into service in Florida next week, the company's president told Reuters on Monday.
The ambitious plan comes only five months after a SpaceX rocket burst into flames on the launch pad at the company's original launch site in Florida. SpaceX, controlled by billionaire Elon Musk, has only launched one rocket since then, in mid-January.
“We should be launching every two to three weeks,” SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell told Reuters in an interview on Monday.
SpaceX was approaching that pace last autumn, before the Sept. 1 accident, which happened during a routine preflight test. The explosion destroyed a $200 million Israeli satellite and heavily damaged the launch pad.
Shotwell said repairs to the launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, which are still underway, should cost “far less than half” of a new launch pad, which she said runs about $100 million. The new launch pad is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, just north of the Cape Canaveral site.
SpaceX is also modifying the rocket's engines to increase performance and resolve potential safety concerns, said Shotwell.
The company plans to change the design of the Falcon 9's turbopump - which provides propellants to the rocket's engines - to eliminate cracks that have prompted concern from NASA and the U.S. Air Force.
NASA has hired SpaceX to taxi astronauts to and from the International Space Station starting in late 2018.
Shotwell said the new turbopumps will be installed before the first unmanned test flights of the commercial space taxi, scheduled for November.
SpaceX is one of two companies certified to fly military and national security satellites for the Air Force, the other being United Launch Alliance, a partnership of Boeing Co ( BA.N ) and Lockheed Martin Corp ( LMT.N ).
“For us, the concern was not the cracks, but do they grow over time? Would these cracks cause a flight failure?” Shotwell said. “I think NASA is used to engines that aren’t quite as robust, so they just don’t want any cracks at all in the turbo machinery."
SpaceX discovered two types of cracks during ground tests of its Merlin engines in 2015, Shotwell said. The cracks were not related to the Sept. 1 launch pad explosion.
To fix the more serious cracking issue, the company devised a software fix and then redesigned the turbine wheel, Shotwell said. The first of the redesigned turbine wheels flew in July 2016.
A second set of cracks in welds and shrouds are not a concern for flight, but NASA and the Air Force have asked for a redesign, Shotwell said.
SpaceX has a backlog of more than 70 missions, worth more than $10 billion. It has successfully flown 27 out of 29 times since the Falcon 9’s debut in 2010.
The company flew eight missions in 2016 before the launch pad accident in September grounded the fleet. The rocket returned to flight last month, flying from a second launch site in California, which is only used for satellites heading into polar or high inclination orbits.
A fourth launch site in Texas is under construction.
Наконец поступила информация по подробнее. Уже писал, раз трещины, значит расчетная модель не адекватна . Теперь доработают расчетную модель, поправят конструкцию, это радует. Правда настораживает, что с нужными доработками так долго тянут, и исправляют только под давлением контролирующих органов.
Не очень ясно со второй группой трещин - где по детальней?
 
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https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/829431073863897088
Jeff Foust@jeff_foust9 февр. 2017 г.
Koenigsmann said after the panel SpaceX hopes to have SLC-40 ready for launches again within a few months. #CST2017
 
https://www.wired.com/2017/02/launching-rockets-business-hence-explosions-layoffs/
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Chelsea Leu
Date of Publication: 02.08.17.
Time of Publication: 11:30 am.
More Money, More Problems for the Commercial Space Launch Biz
Space X's Iridium 1 landing on January 14th, 2017. Space X/Flickr

Last week was a rough one for the two largest US commercial space launch companies. On Thursday, United Launch Alliance confirmed it would lay off up to 400 people fr om its workforce by the end of the year, following a smaller round in 2016. Meanwhile, government investigators apparently found a flaw in SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rockets—crack-prone fuel-pumping fans.
Those developments demonstrate how each company is racing to turn a profit sending payloads into space. In that sense, commercial rocket launching is just like any other industry: Cut costs and maximize profits. In ULA’s case, that means slimming the workforce. For SpaceX, the flaws reportedly found in the government investigation (which the Wall Street Journal covered first) could indicate that the company has been streamlining its rocket manufacturing a bit too much.
These two companies are important in part because they’re both government contractors. In 2015, government contracts represented 69 percent of revenues in the $5.4 billion global launch industry. That same year, after a two-year long process, SpaceX got certification from the Air Force to bid for national security projects. (It’s now working on an $82.7 million contract for the Air Force to launch a GPS satellite in 2018.) ULA is its only competitor cleared to do the same. SpaceX is slated to resupply the ISS in mid-February, and its eventual goal is to carry astronauts there too.
So these two competitors are fighting to get the biggest chunks of a relatively small market. “It costs hundreds of millions of dollars to build and launch a satellite, which is practically the size of an industry for other industries,” says Carissa Christensen, the CEO of Tauri Space and Technology, a consulting and analytics firm. Because payloads are so expensive, companies (or government agencies) looking to launch them into space want the best deal.
Plus, cost is the thing that determines how big the space market will become. You can’t have a bustling asteroid mining business if it’s too pricey to haul mining equipment to space.
But the two companies have used different strategies to keep clients. ULA, a collaboration between Boeing and Lockheed Martin, has a flawless launch record. They’ve never lost a rocket, but safety comes at a cost. According to ULA’s RocketBuilder tool, strapping your satellite to one of its Delta V rockets will cost you a minimum of $109 million. SpaceX advertises the same service starting at $60 million, and that’ll come way down once Elon Musk starts selling launches on used first stage boosters. “SpaceX is like a jackrabbit, and ULA is a buffalo that realizes it needs to be a jackrabbit,” says Keith Cowing, a former NASA employee who runs the blog NASA Watch.
SpaceX cuts costs by building all its own stuff, innovating quickly, and being able to shuttle payloads right out of the gate. It currently does more lift-off-ing for the government, but its combustion-cluttered track record could be a liability for future gigs. The Falcon 9 that exploded during fueling last September is the second Musk has lost since 2010, when Falcon 9s debuted. The explosion caused a huge gap in SpaceX’s increasingly busy launch schedule, and prompted the Government Accountability Office investigation that reportedly found the fuel pump flaw.
The company also has a reputation in the industry for pushing its engineers to work long days. That might be fine for all the young, hungry talent, but could be a liability for developing a mature engineering culture. “It’ll be a challenge to retain seasoned senior engineers who don’t want to work 100-hour weeks,” says Richard Rocket, the head of analysis firm NewSpace Global.
Largely, the company has shrugged off technical problems as the natural result of building new rockets. (A SpaceX spokesperson says the company has modified the design to avoid the troublesome fuel fans entirely, and that it was an old flaw.) But these issues can counterintuitively be a good sign. “Usually, you don’t know you’re working at full potential until you start encountering problems,” Cowing says. If that’s true, the rocket business might be exactly wh ere it should be: lifting off.
Изменено: Salo - 09.02.2017 14:32:25
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"
 
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crack-prone fuel-pumping fans
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According to ULA’s RocketBuilder tool, strapping your satellite to one of its Delta V rockets
в охумору
 
http://spaceflightnow.com/2017/02/08/spacex-readies-rocket-for-tests-at-historic-pad-39a/
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SpaceX readies rocket for tests at historic pad 39A
February 8, 2017 Stephen Clark

An aerial view of launch pad 39A fr om late 2015. Credit: NASA

SpaceX engineers are preparing to mount a Falcon 9 rocket at Kennedy Space Center’s historic launch pad 39A for the first time this week as the company declares the modified facility ready to support a new era of commercial space missions.
The two-stage rocket, without its payload, could roll out of SpaceX’s hangar at the southern perimeter of pad 39A and up the ramp to the launch mount as soon as Thursday.
SpaceX aims to fill the rocket with super-chilled kerosene and liquid oxygen propellants Friday — if everything goes according to plan — for a hotfire test of the Falcon 9’s first stage engines. The nine Merlin 1D powerplants will fire and power up to 1.7 million pounds of thrust for several seconds, sending a plume of exhaust out of pad 39A’s redesigned flame trench.
Sensors in each engine will measure many performance parameters during the brief ignition at the launch pad. Hold-down restraints will keep the rocket on the ground.
SpaceX is prepping the rocket for a launch targeted for around 10:01 a.m. EST (1501 GMT) on Feb. 18 with a Dragon cargo craft flying to the International Space Station. The commercial supply ship is slated to carry 5,266 pounds (2,389 kilograms) of equipment and experiments to the orbiting laboratory.
The crucial static fire test will double as a check of the rocket’s readiness for flight and the function of the launch pad’s fueling, telemetry and water deluge systems, all of which were overhauled by SpaceX in recent months.
Once the test is complete, ground crews will lower the rocket and attach the Dragon cargo freighter for launch next weekend.
Hans Koenigsmann, SpaceX’s vice president of flight reliability, said Wednesday that testing of the new ground systems at 39A was nearly complete, allowing managers to move ahead with rollout of the rocket.
“This is a huge pad,” Koenigsmann said. “The runs fr om the LOX (liquid oxygen) farm and the fuel farm down to the launch head are huge. The transporter-erector is huge. It’s like one-and-a-half million pounds of steel, and (it has) so much technology because this thing controls all the interfaces (with the rocket).”
The transporter-erector will carry rockets from the hangar up the incline to the pad, then lift the vehicles vertical. The rocket carrier was observed vertical at pad 39A in the last few weeks, and on Wednesday it was seen moving back toward the hangar, wh ere the Falcon 9 rocket sits awaiting the static fire.
“There was nothing in particular that gave us a hard time,” Koenigsmann told reporters Wednesday during the Federal Aviation Administration’s 20th Annual Commercial Space Transportation Conference in Washington. “It’s more like this whole thing was a huge effort, and at the end of it you want to test and test things again to make sure that they’re ready to go.”

A view of launch pad 39A, with SpaceX’s rocket erector vertical, taken on Jan. 26. Credit: Walter Scriptunas II / Scriptunas Images

The last time a rocket stood at pad 39A was in July 2011, when the space shuttle Atlantis lifted off on the final flight of NASA’s iconic winged spaceships. SpaceX signed a 20-year lease for the launch complex from NASA in 2014, and preparations at pad 39A took on a feverish pace last year after the company’s other launch facility at Cape Canaveral sustained major damage when a rocket exploded.
SpaceX resumed launches Jan. 14 with a successful Falcon 9 mission from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, but the company’s return-to-flight in Florida has been paced by the construction at pad 39A.
NASA launched 12 Saturn 5 rockets from pad 39A during the Apollo moon program — including Apollo 11 — and 82 shuttle flights departed from the seaside launch complex.
But NASA decided it no longer needed pad 39A after the shuttle’s retirement. Nearby launch pad 39B, previously built for Apollo and shuttle flights, will be home to NASA’s Space Launch System, a government-owned heavy-lift rocket that will launch astronaut crews on deep space expeditions.
The concrete foundation of pad 39A dates back to the Apollo era of the 1960s, while the 347-foot-tall (106-meter) fixed service structure and lightning tower were emplaced before the first shuttle launch.
“It gives me a little bit of chills when I walk out there and see stuff that’s left over from Apollo,” Koenigsmann said.
Since SpaceX took over, changes to pad 39A have included the construction of the new rocket hangar outside the south gate to the facility, wh ere space shuttles and Saturn 5 moon rockets arrived on top of tracked crawler-transporters after rollout from the nearby Vehicle Assembly Building.
The hangar can accommodate five Falcon 9 rocket cores at a time, according to SpaceX.

File photo of three recovered Falcon 9 first stage boosters inside the hangar at pad 39A last year. Credit: SpaceX

Other additions include the installation of RP-1 kerosene fuel tanks and the construction of the massive transporter-erector, which is sized to accommodate SpaceX’s powerful triple-body Falcon Heavy rocket when it debuts later this year.
“The transporter-erector is big enough to do Falcon Heavy. We can launch Falcon 9 with it in the center, of course, but the Falcon Heavy drives the size of it,” Koenigsmann said. “You can see … It’s bigger than the one we used to have.”
The facility’s water system has also been refurbished to provide acoustic and heat protection to the pad deck during liftoffs, and the water tower at the northeast perimeter of the pad has been repainted, now emblazoned with the SpaceX logo.
Later this year, SpaceX plans to add an access arm to pad 39A’s fixed service structure for astronaut crews to board a human-rated version of the Dragon spacecraft beginning in 2018. SpaceX and Boeing have contracts with NASA to develop commercial spaceships to rotate crews between Earth and the space station.
SpaceX officials intend to base crewed launches and Falcon Heavy missions from pad 39A, and flights for the U.S. military and some commercial missions will be launched from pad 40 a few miles to the south.
Pad 40, which lies on U.S. Air Force property, should be ready for launches again in a few months after ground teams finish clean-up and repairs following the catastrophic explosion of a Falcon 9 booster there in September.
The rocket was destroyed during the final countdown before a static fire test Sept. 1, along with an Israeli-owned communications satellite.
SpaceX said the construction crew working at pad 39A will move over to pad 40 in the coming weeks. A firm timetable for pad 40’s availability for launches will be better known once repairs begin, but the facility could be ready by the middle of the year, officials said.
SpaceX aims to launch once every two weeks after pad 39A is inaugurated later this month, continuing with the deployment of an EchoStar communications satellite in early March, then the launch of an SES telecom payload aboard a previously-flown first stage booster later in March.
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"
 
Много фото:
http://projecthabu.com/post/157088764130/for-the-first-time-since-2011-a-rocket-sits
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"
 
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/02/fire-lc-39a-falcon-9-crs-10-launch/
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"
 
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Jonathan McDowell ‏@planet4589 10 ч.10 часов назад
This month's Falcon 9 launch will be the 95th launch from Complex 39A and the first ever non-@NASA launch from NASA Kennedy Space Center
"Были когда-то и мы рысаками!!!"
 
https://www.reddit.com/r/spacex/comments/5tklb4/falcon_9ft_first_stage_flight_a­nalysis/

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